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Horror Award 2019: Why you should be writing horror…

Horror Award 2019: Why you should be writing horror…

There’s just one week to go until our inaugural Horror Award closes for submissions – meaning your chance to become the first ever winner of this new award is nearly over! But what are the advantages of writing in this genre?

There’s a good reason why we picked horror as the second genre to celebrate in our new series of awards. It’s a fantastic proving ground for new filmmakers to achieve success – and that includes writers! Here are some of the reasons why you should be writing horror…

  • It’s almost always in high demand, giving you a better chance of getting into production than some other genres! Here at WriteMovies, we get plenty of interest in horror scripts from producers and companies. And that’s because…
  • It’s often cheap to produce. A lot of classic horror tropes use a small number of locations and a small cast, and the use of suspense also cuts costs compared to all-out action! But even if your horror script doesn’t look so cheap, that might not be a problem–
  • Because there’s a strong core audience for horror. Some people just can’t get enough of it, meaning that horror films have a good chance of recouping their budget and then providing profits!

So make sure you submit your script to our Horror Award by this Sunday, September 29th! The winner will receive two sets of Development Notes, guaranteed pitching to industry, and further advice on script development…

Plus all submissions get free entry to the Fall 2019 Screenwriting Contest, and the chance to win the Grand Prize of $2000!

WriteMovies Horror Award Deadline – Two Weeks to Go!

WriteMovies Horror Award Deadline – Two Weeks to Go!

The WriteMovies Horror Award deadline approaches… With just two weeks to go until the competition closes, make sure you don’t miss out on the chance to become the first ever winner of this new prize!

For our 20th Anniversary year, we decided to celebrate great writing with a series of genre awards. After the success of our Sci-Fi and Fantasy Award in the spring, horror is the next genre we wanted to get people writing.

Do you think you’ve got a talent for scaring people? Whether it’s serial killers or monsters, drenched in blood or all in the mind, we’d love to read what you’ve got!

The winner of this award will receive:

  • Guaranteed pitching to industry
  • Two sets of Development Notes to help take their script to the next level
  • Further advice to fine tune their script from our experts

Plus, all entries to the Horror Award also receive automatic entry to the Fall 2019 Screenwriting Contest. That gives you the chance to take home the Grand Prize of $2000, plus other prizes!

Most importantly though, this is your opportunity to be the first writer to win the award for this genre. Prove your skills as a screenwriter and be recognized for your work!

Remember, the Horror Award deadline is just two weeks away on September 29th. Make sure you submit by then to take your first steps towards becoming one of our winners!

If you need some inspiration before then, take a look at our reviews of some of our favorite horror films and shows. Find out what we like and what we’re looking for in a horror script.

And then, when you’re ready… Click here to enter the WriteMovies Horror Award 2019!

Writing Insights: How to Write An Adaptation

Writing Insights: How to Write An Adaptation

books - how to write an adaptationTo say that book adaptations are popular would be an understatement. Stephen King received no fewer than four in 2017 alone, and has the same set for this year (although only PET SEMATARY has so far seen a release). But what’s the best way to write an adaptation?

There are a few key things if you want to write an adaptation. The first is the big difference in length between a book and a screenplay! The average novel is approximately 90,000 words (with something like WAR AND PEACE getting up over 580,000!), but the average screenplay is only about 15,000.

That means a lot of words need to get cut! A lot of things won’t make it from the book into your screenplay, so don’t try to include everything. But how do you know what to leave in and what to take out?

Here are our tips…

  • Identify the central drama and themes, and use them as a signpost. If there’s a scene, subplot, or character that doesn’t add to the central drama, you don’t need it!
  • Think about the roles that the different characters serve: what their purpose is in the story. Can any of those characters be combined into one? A screenplay can easily feel cluttered with characters who aren’t needed, so try rolling them into one.
  • Look for the key points in the story, like the inciting incident and the turning points between the acts. These moments are absolutely vital; you should look to map them directly into your script and work from there.
  • Don’t try to copy and paste the dialogue – it (probably) won’t work! The dialogue in a novel is meant to be read in our heads, but the dialogue in a screenplay is designed to be spoken out loud. That means it will usually need to be rewritten.
  • Film is a visual medium – use that to your advantage! Where a novel may need many pages of description or inner monologues to convey a concept or thought, a script can do the same thing with a quick visual clue. Your audience should be able to see what is happening, so they don’t need it explained to them!

There are plenty of other things to think about if you want to write an adaptation, but we’d suggest this is where you start. Novels and screenplays are very different mediums – and that is a fact that shouldn’t be forgotten!

One other thing before you start writing: make sure you pick your project carefully. Some novels rely very heavily on interior thought and description to tell their stories, and won’t translate well to film which (as mentioned above!) is primarily visual.

And above all else, make sure you love the book you’re turning into a script! There’s nothing worse than getting halfway through a project before starting to regret it.

Already finished your script, adaptation or otherwise? Think you’ve got what it takes to impress us? The WriteMovies Fall 2019 Screenwriting Competition is now open for submissions – click here to find out more and enter today!